Demo: Event 3

Submitted by admin on Tue, 11/10/2020 - 20:46
Event date/time

This is example of event with a registration form that sends an email confirmation and an email reminder 1 day before the event.

Demo: Event 2

Submitted by admin on Tue, 11/10/2020 - 20:46
Event date/time

This is example of event with a registration form that sends an email confirmation and an email reminder 1 day before the event.

Demo: Event 1

Submitted by admin on Tue, 11/10/2020 - 20:46
Event date/time

This is example of event with a registration form that sends an email confirmation and an email reminder 1 day before the event.

Building machines that think and learn like people

Recent progress in artificial intelligence (AI) has renewed interest in building systems that learn and think like people. Many advances have come from using deep neural networks trained end-to-end in tasks such as object recognition, video games, and board games, achieving performance that equals or even beats humans in some respects. Despite their biological inspiration and performance achievements, these systems differ from human intelligence in crucial ways.

It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see

People frequently interpret the same information differently, based on their prior beliefs and views. This may occur in everyday settings, as when two friends are watching the same movie, but also in more consequential circumstances, such as when people interpret the same news differently based on their political views. The role of subjective knowledge in altering how the brain processes narratives has been explored mainly in controlled settings.